Indigenous public art unveiled in Reconciliation partnership initiative in Lethbridge

As part of Reconciliation month and efforts through the City, a new art mural has been installed outside the Telus centre in downtown Lethbridge. The City of Lethbridge, through the Reconciliation Lethbridge Advisory Committee, Telus, Heart of Our City Committee, and Public Art Committee put out a call for Indigenous artists to create an art piece which reflects the theme of the 5th Annual Reconciliation Week: Voice and Representation.

 

Artists Cheyenne McGinnis. and Hali Heavy Shield were the successful applicants who were able to get their work displayed.

 

Community Arts and Cultural Manager, with the City of Lethbridge, Jillian Bracken, says artists Cheyenne McGinnis and Hali Heavy Shield were the successful applicants who were able to get their work displayed.

 

“We’re looking to celebrate more Indigenous voices and public spaces, to give more Indigenous artists opportunities to display their art as part of the City’s art collection. We’re just really excited that we get to realize this project as part of the kick off to reconciliation week,” says Bracken. 

 

“I wanted to be very intentional about including Blackfoot language and culture into these pieces because of the theme of reconciliation week being Voices and Representation. So, for the youth and Lethbridge residents to be able to see, witness, and hear Blackfoot language was really important to me,” says Heavy Shield.

 

The new murals are expected to be up for approximately six months and are located on the Telus building in downtown Lethbridge.

Karsen Marczuk

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